What would you like changed about a game?

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CJTreader

Moderator
Staff member
Premium Member
#1
All games have flaws. Even my favorite game, Fallout: New Vegas, has several systems which I would like tweaked, overhauled, and, in a couple cases, outright removed. What's a specific change you would like made to a game? The keyword here is specific, so I'm looking for an answer more along the lines of 'Skyrim should have a lock on system' than 'Skyrim needs better combat'.
 
#2
i want the reputation and disguise system in Fallout NV to work properly, the entire skill system to be added back into Fallout 4, and I want splitscreen multiplayer to be added to the PC ports of the Borderlands series, to name a few. I suppose I'd also like to see Sonic 06 not have horrible hitboxes.
 

Wolfensanity

Moderator
Staff member
#3
I love Hitman 7, but I absolutely HATE its rating system. Hitman is a series all about creatively killing your targets, often needing to improvise, and Hitman 7 is, for the most part, designed the way a Hitman game should be. However, the rating system in Hitman 7 enforces playing the game in very specific and linear ways to be rewarded with a higher score, and you're often punished heavily for what the game will consider mistakes, which isn't always clear. I would like to see a rework of the entire thing from the ground up, and instead take a more 'Blood Money' approach. In Blood Money, you weren't rated with numbers or stars, but with a newspaper detailing how many you killed during a mission, and labeling you with a title based on how you performed. If you went on a crazed shooting spree, your notoriety would increase, and if you decide to not pay it off, future levels may be more difficult. Outside of silent assassin, none of this exists in Hitman 7. It's just a star rating and a number for their stupid leaderboard.

Here's the list of ratings in the classic Hitman games. It's extensive and flexible, unlike the system in Hitman 7. https://hitman.fandom.com/wiki/Ratings
 

Radvantage

Administrator
Staff member
#5
I love the Divinity Original Sin games (from what I've played), but it took me 25 hours of multiple characters (in OS2) to figure out how to succeed in combat and make a character I like. Encounters are incredibly rewarding, and combat doesn't feel like hotbar spamming but still flexible enough if you understand positioning, the enemies, and how armors/resistances work. I like a classic CRPG experience, but having to learn and obsess over everything for so long is not intuitive at all.

Using the environment to kill your foes, great, but it's such a weird concept when you first get into it, not totally foreign, but initially I felt like I had to take advantage of every single barrel or fire scroll or else I'd waste a bunch of resources or have to load a save due to the steep difficulty.

I've found that the difficulty is decent at this stage, because after dozens of hours I actually know what abilities are useful for what I want to do. It's probably safe to say that it's my favorite turn-based combat system in an RPG, but the game makes a really lazy effort to teach people how to succeed and have some simple fun in the beginning to hook them in. I'd be fine with mowing down rats and some dumb Magister trainees for the first five hours with a couple of basic abilities, gradually introducing more stuff into the mix (smarter AI, more hazards) so I could appreciate it rather than have to put in the extra 30-hour effort to feel confident enough to continue questing.

I know I could just have started playing on easy, but after learning how to use the system, I feel like I'd really miss out cheesing through the whole game like that. I like thinking about my stats and ability combos, what strategies I'm going to try each turn, and so on. It's just that I've had to repeat the Fort Joy segment (an exaggerated) 1 billion times to get to a point where I can make informed choices in combat, and it's also derailed my investment in the story/character setup which sucks.

TLDR; avoiding the simple "combat too hard" criticism, I'll say that the learning curve for newcomers is ridiculous, balance the beginning to introduce mechanics gradually so combat is just as rewarding later on when players have a grasp on their build, and have more dumb enemies to "train" on.
 

CJTreader

Moderator
Staff member
Premium Member
#6
I love the Divinity Original Sin games (from what I've played), but it took me 25 hours of multiple characters (in OS2) to figure out how to succeed in combat and make a character I like. Encounters are incredibly rewarding, and combat doesn't feel like hotbar spamming but still flexible enough if you understand positioning, the enemies, and how armors/resistances work. I like a classic CRPG experience, but having to learn and obsess over everything for so long is not intuitive at all.

Using the environment to kill your foes, great, but it's such a weird concept when you first get into it, not totally foreign, but initially I felt like I had to take advantage of every single barrel or fire scroll or else I'd waste a bunch of resources or have to load a save due to the steep difficulty.

I've found that the difficulty is decent at this stage, because after dozens of hours I actually know what abilities are useful for what I want to do. It's probably safe to say that it's my favorite turn-based combat system in an RPG, but the game makes a really lazy effort to teach people how to succeed and have some simple fun in the beginning to hook them in. I'd be fine with mowing down rats and some dumb Magister trainees for the first five hours with a couple of basic abilities, gradually introducing more stuff into the mix (smarter AI, more hazards) so I could appreciate it rather than have to put in the extra 30-hour effort to feel confident enough to continue questing.

I know I could just have started playing on easy, but after learning how to use the system, I feel like I'd really miss out cheesing through the whole game like that. I like thinking about my stats and ability combos, what strategies I'm going to try each turn, and so on. It's just that I've had to repeat the Fort Joy segment (an exaggerated) 1 billion times to get to a point where I can make informed choices in combat, and it's also derailed my investment in the story/character setup which sucks.

TLDR; avoiding the simple "combat too hard" criticism, I'll say that the learning curve for newcomers is ridiculous, balance the beginning to introduce mechanics gradually so combat is just as rewarding later on when players have a grasp on their build, and have more dumb enemies to "train" on.
It's pretty damn hard on easy sometimes.

That's why I play a lot of these games on easy: it just puts you off the characters and world when you need to spend 20 hours gittin' gud.
 
Last edited:

guul66

Funk Police, Anti-Edgy department
#7
Fallout 3 - add iron sights, make karma invisible
Fallout New Vegas - make karma invisible, add some interesting moral choices
Titanfall 2 - FUCK THE KRABER! FUCK THE NORTHSTAR!
Stardew Valley - add a thing that reads my mind when I exit the game and then teleports the thoughts back to me when I next play the game so I remember what the fuck I was doing whenever I have a time I don't play the game for a few weeks.
 

Monte

Founder/Forum Cowboy
Staff member
Site Founder
#8
I want Fallout 76 to be able to be played offline or with private servers. I would also like it to have NPC’s, and at least the same dialogue system/rpg mechanics (can keep perk cards) as FO4, but keep the same world. Also have faction PvP and more diverse gameplay besides just collecting junk. Bethesda could still add most of these things if they wanted to, but they probably won’t, which is a shame bc this game had so much potential.
 

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