Why I'm worried about Fallout 76.

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Why I’m Worried About Fallout 76
Written by: @Karax9699
Edited by @Monte

Fallout 76.jpg

Almost four months after its announcement, I'm still worried about Fallout 76. The game was announced on May 30th to excitement and suprise that we were getting another Fallout game so soon after Fallout 4. The trailer was interesting, and left questions for us to answer which Bethesda promised we'd get at E3. This was a mistake in my opinion. Between May 30th and June 10th, the date we'd get more information, peoples ideas and expectations weren't officially kept in check. Some people, including myself,expected a traditional Bethesda RPG from the Fallout series and Bethesda failed to inform us of the fact it wouldn't be; leaving that to leakers such as Kotaku’s Jason Schreier. This was their main mistake. During the launch event I felt excited, then after the conference my optimism had gone but I was intrigued about the game.

"Okay, the game will be an open world RPG with other players, that's pretty neat. This could be good" I remember thinking.

My opinion has changed since then, mainly due to Bethesda’s continued failure to market the game well. Following their E3 showcase, Bethesda should have shown us as much gameplay as they could, to let people know the game is still going to be great. This hasn't happened, instead they have released animated videos using Vault Boy talking through game elements, which have been unable to explain what the game does to combat grieving or properly explain how the game plays. They've only given generic information, like saying that there are quests, but not showing how they actually work in the game. We can build. However, they are yet to actually show us HOW we build using the C.A.M.P. . They have said the only NPC’s are robots, well then how do we quest? Where do we turn them in? Are there vendors? Can we kill quest givers? Are there safe-zones across the map? These are a few of the questions I have about the game that have yet to be properly addressed. The marketing has not been up to standard that we expect from Bethesda, even in comparison to their marketing of Fallout 4. With Fallout 4, we got a much meatier E3 demo, with numerous other trailers featuring gameplay leading up to launch, as well as the animated S.P.E.C.I.A.L videos which supplemented them.

04DEC506-820B-4E45-B734-400D2C0677B2.jpeg
Bethesda’s animated Vault Boy marketing for Fallout 76 has been big on style, but short on substance.
Now, to Bethesda’s credit, they are used to making single-player open world RPG's, not Online-Survival type games. I can see the passion the developers express during interviews about this new experience, but that’s not too great for building excitement. I'm worried because, frankly, we don't know anything about this game. I don't think the game will be bad, and I want to like the game, I truly do. I can see myself having fun with the game, but I am still skeptical. I am worried the game will flop, and I am also concerned that the game won't feel like a Fallout game. I am also worried it won't provide as much enjoyment for me, a primarily solo player. I understand the game is a multi-player game, but many people (especially Bethesda fans) prefer to play solo. Sea of Thieves, Rainbow Six Siege, and GTA Online are all multiplayer and also have enjoyable single-player experiences.

I hope Fallout 76 turns out to be very enjoyable, and I will be purchasing it. I still feel hyped, but I’m pretty worried. 76 has potential to fail miserably, and as someone who enjoys Fallout and Bethesda, that's not something I thought I'd need to worry about from them. Hopefully the B.E.T.A clarifies many of the questions surrounding the game, and shows us it's still Bethesda Game Studios at their best.


Fallout 76 (Developed by Bethesda Game Studios) Launches November 14th, 2018
 
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#2
i think they feel a similar technique to how they showed off fallout 4 is gonna work but there was why more 'pre-hype' too fallout 4 which there just wasn't at all for most people for 76.

i also hope they will be more types of cheese but that might just be me.
 
#3
i think they feel a similar technique to how they showed off fallout 4 is gonna work but there was why more 'pre-hype' too fallout 4 which there just wasn't at all for most people for 76.

i also hope they will be more types of cheese but that might just be me.
I believe it will have at least 4x the variety of cheeses as Fallout 4.
 
#5
It does have the potential to fail miserably but I think it's better than them making oblivion 7 with a few more features. They are trying something new and that should be encouraged and not limited by what people believe a fallout game should be.
 
#7
I understand believe me, but this is a spin off and it’s honestly necessary for BGS to do something new in between the SP RPG’s, tbh that’s what i think the Austin Studio is here to do and it’s good
 

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